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Xperia active Official Thread


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Posted by Phoner


*Dust proof and water resistant smartphone powered by Android™
*Scratch resistant multi touch screen with wet finger tracking
*All the applications for your active life, including on-screen heart rate monitoring through ANT+

22 June 2011, Singapore –Sony Ericsson today announced Xperia™ active, a compact smartphone targeting consumers with an active lifestyle, in conjunction with CommunicAsia 2011 in Singapore. With a 3” screen and running the latest Android platform for smartphones (Gingerbread 2.3), the phone packs Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA® Engine, a 5mp camera with HD video functionality, and a powerful 1Ghz processor. Xperia™ active is dust proof and water resistant* and uniquely incorporates wet finger tracking, to ensure the phone works perfectly when either the screen or a user’s fingers are wet.


The phone comes pre-loaded with sports apps that enable consumers to easily track their fitness levels. Users can set their ideal training route using the built-in GPS, Barometer and Compass. On-screen heart rate and pulse can be monitored in realtime (enabled by ANT+ wireless networking technology), while the iMapMyFitness app can monitor day to day performance. Additionally, Facebook inside Xperia™ allows consumers to share their progress and experiences with friends.

Fredrik Månsson, Global Product Marketing Manager, Sony Ericsson said: “Xperia™ active is the ultimate smartphone for an active life. Not only is it packed with all the features and applications consumers need for a worry free mobile life, it also comes with a set of accessories that make it fun and easy for them to take it everywhere, whatever their daily plans are.”

Maria Sharapova, a three time grand slam winning tennis player added: “I love this smartphone because it perfectly fits both my professional and personal needs. It keeps me in touch with my friends as I travel the world on the pro tour and tracks my fitness both on and off the court.”

Extras included in the box to further build the consumer experience:

One extra exchangeable soft touch back cover
Detachable ear hooks for the portable handsfree active headset
Wrist strap to keep the phone close at all times
An arm case for use during a workout
2GB memory card to save all your special moments
Micro USB cable for charging and computer data transfer
*Water resistant – the phone can be kept under 1m of water for 30 mins.

Sony Ericsson Xperia™ active will be available globally in selected markets from Q3 2011.

Sony Ericsson Xperia active at a glance.

*Please note that all services mentioned below may not be available in every market.

Colours

Orange band with black back cover – white extra cover in the kit
White band with black back cover – white extra cover in the kit
Facts

Operating system: Google™ Android 2.3 (Gingerbread)
Size: 55 x 92 x 16.5mm
Weight: 110.8 grams
Camera

5 megapixel camera
8x digital zoom
Auto focus
Aperture f/2.6
Face detection
Face recognition
Flash/Photo light
Flash/LED
Geo tagging
HD video recording (720p)
Image stabiliser
Red-eye reduction
Scene detection
Self-timer
Send to web
Smile detection
Touch capture
Touch focus
Video light
Video recording
Music

Album art
Bluetooth™ stereo (A2DP)
Media player
Music tones (MP3/AAC)
PlayNow™ service
Sony Ericsson Music Player
TrackID™ music recognition
xLOUD™
Internet

Android Market™
Bookmarks
Google™ search
Google Voice Search
NeoReader™ barcode scanner
Pan & zoom
Web browser (WebKit)
Communication

Call list
Conference calls
Facebook™ application
Google Talk™
Noise Shield
Polyphonic ringtones
Skype™
Sony Ericsson Timescape™
Speakerphone
Twitter™ (Timescape™ integration)
Vibrating alert
Messaging

Conversations
Email
Google Mail™
Instant messaging
Multimedia messaging (MMS)
Predictive text input
Sound recorder
Text messaging (SMS)
Design

Auto rotation
Four-corner Home screen
Keyboard (on-screen, 12 key)
Picture wallpaper
Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA® Engine
Touch screen
Live wallpaper
Dust and water resistant
Wet finger tracking
Entertainment

3D games
Health mate
Media browser
Motion gaming
Radio (FM radio with RDS)
Radio (FM)
Video streaming
Video viewing
Walk Mate
YouTube™
Organiser

Alarm clock
Calculator
Calendar
Document readers
eCompass™
E-Manual
Flight mode
Google Calendar™
Google Gallery 3D™
Infinite button
iMapMyFitness
Phonebook
Setup guide
Stopwatch
Tasks
Timer
Torch functionality
Widget manager
Connectivity

3.5 mm audio jack
aGPS
Bluetooth™ technology
DLNA™ Certified
Google Latitude™
Google Maps™ for Mobile
Google Maps™ with Street View
Media Transfer Protocol support
Micro USB support
Modem
Native USB tethering
Pressure sensor
Synchronisation via Facebook™
Synchronisation via Google Sync™
Synchronisation via Sony Ericsson Sync
Synchronisation with computer
Synchronisation via Microsoft® Exchange ActiveSync®
USB mass storage
USB High speed 2.0 support
USB support
Wi-Fi®
Wi-Fi® Hotspot functionality
Wisepilot™ turn-by-turn navigation
Display

Reality Display with Mobile BRAVIA® Engine
16,777,216 colour TFT
Capacitive touchscreen (multi-touch) with wet finger tracking
3 inches
320 x 480 pixels
Scratch-resistant mineral glass
Memory

Phone memory (user-free): Up to 320MB
Memory card support: microSD™, up to 32GB
Memory card included: 2GB microSD™
Battery life

Talk time GSM/GPRS: Up to 4 hrs 53 min*
Standby time GSM/GPRS: Up to 351 hrs*
Talk time UMTS: Up to 5 hrs 31 min*
Standby time UMTS: Up to 335 hrs*
Music listening time: Up to 25 hrs
Video playback time: Up to 8 hrs 30 min
*According to GSM Association Battery Life Measurement Technique. Battery performance may vary depending on network conditions and configurations, and phone usage.
Networks

UMTS HSPA 900, 2100
GSM GPRS/EDGE 850, 900, 1800, 1900
UMTS HSPA 800, 1900, 2100
GSM GPRS/EDGE 850, 900, 1800, 1900
In the kit

Xperia™ active
1200mah removable battery
Sport stereo headset
Arm case
Wrist strap
2GB microsd™ memory card
Exchangeable cover
Charger
Micro USB cable for charging
Synchronisation and file transfer, and user documentation

Official page with specifications

Official press release
[ This Message was edited by: Phoner on 2013-01-22 13:21 ]



Posted by mode
Supercool! Hope there's supercool specs to match it

Posted by razec
^^ I don't know if my eyes are fooling me, but it looks quite small judging from the size of the Sony Ericsson logo. so i think this is the resurgent W710 made for fitness. i hope there's an armband accessory as well

Posted by HxH
Yes, first look remind me of W710 walkman fitness as well

Posted by DarkKrypt
motoflip abit?
still looks good

Posted by roanmy
It's too bad.
I would SO buy this if it had 480x854, but they crippled it.

It really suck that to get an "active" phone, you have to get one with low specs. =(

Posted by mustafabay
I see this as a X8 successor which means its great and with these specs it should slot just under the xperia mini.

Posted by HxH
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5BE_MIr36A

promo


backside look cheap toy for me.
[ This Message was edited by: HxH on 2011-06-22 11:55 ]


Posted by goldenface
Thanks Phoner for posting the spec list. Not a bad niche product, it seems to have all the necessary specs apart from HDMI out.

Posted by MNX1024
I was just about to get this to replace my cycling computer, but after reading the specs, it became a no.

This is suppose to be a sports phone..... A real GPS is expected, not an aGPS. Freaking ridiculous!!!! This is a big mistake on SE's end.

Posted by Bonovox


Posted by 5tephane

On 2011-06-22 17:38:26, MNX1024 wrote:
I was just about to get this to replace my cycling computer, but after reading the specs, it became a no.

This is suppose to be a sports phone..... A real GPS is expected, not an aGPS. Freaking ridiculous!!!! This is a big mistake on SE's end.


aGPS is GPS + assistance, no ?

Posted by Arne Anka
An A-GPS is a GPS which can make use of the mobile network to find the satellites faster. Some A-GPS devices can function as a standalone GPS as well (if a network is present they use it, if not they revert to plain old GPS functionality).
[ This Message was edited by: Arne Anka on 2011-06-22 17:05 ]


Posted by MNX1024
But no aGPS can get a signal within 10 second like my Garmin Edge 500, therefore it's a no no. Let's just say I do use the mobile network to find signal, I highly doubt the phone can last long enough for me to finish my 100+ mile rides, which can last from 5 to 9 hours depending on the route and distance I take. Therefore the aGPS is useless.

Posted by lolstebbo

On 2011-06-22 18:08:14, MNX1024 wrote:
But no aGPS can get a signal within 10 second like my Garmin Edge 500, therefore it's a no no. Let's just say I do use the mobile network to find signal, I highly doubt the phone can last long enough for me to finish my 100+ mile rides, which can last from 5 to 9 hours depending on the route and distance I take. Therefore the aGPS is useless.


aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.

Posted by mode

On 2011-06-22 17:38:26, MNX1024 wrote:
I was just about to get this to replace my cycling computer, but after reading the specs, it became a no.

This is suppose to be a sports phone..... A real GPS is expected, not an aGPS. Freaking ridiculous!!!! This is a big mistake on SE's end.


LOL. You get aGPS just by switching on wireless networks (network assisted GPS to get faster lock, hence aGPS), otherwise it's just GPS. In other words, if you have aGPS, you can always turn off the 'a' prefix to simply use GPS. What on earth do you think aGPS means to be so pissed off?

Posted by MNX1024

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-22 18:37 ]


Posted by mode

On 2011-06-22 19:35:58, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-22 18:37 ]



My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH

Posted by MNX1024

On 2011-06-22 19:41:17, mode wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:35:58, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-22 18:37 ]



My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH



Has nothing to do with how fast I'm going. I'm just saying the fact that I don't want to stop and in certain situation, I can't stop just to fix something. Therefore a high sensitivity sensor would be a better choice than an aGPS. Instead of taking 15 minute for it to fix on to a signal without data, it can just get a fix within a matter of second. In this case, inorder for me to alleviate this issue, I would have to stop my ride and fix it manually. That takes up my training time.

Posted by Arne Anka

On 2011-06-22 19:48:25, MNX1024 wrote:
Instead of taking 15 minute for it to fix on to a signal without data, it can just get a fix within a matter of second.


In airplane mode i.e. when all data and radio signals (except GPS) is disabled, my X10 takes like 5-10 sec to lock onto satelites. This is because network data is cached locally on the phone, so you do not need constant contact with the network.
[ This Message was edited by: Arne Anka on 2011-06-22 20:29 ]


Posted by razec
Imagine if this could also come in Hatha Violet colour version like W710 (too lazy to change the color theme of the display )



or gray


[ This Message was edited by: razec on 2011-06-23 02:51 ]


Posted by jplacson

On 2011-06-22 19:41:17, mode wrote:

My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH



I totally agree. I was initially skeptical with my X10 MP aGPS since past aGPS phones never had a real GPS chip and just cheated by using network info.

Initial cold-start lock of a Garmin is faster IF aGPS on the Mini Pro is disabled. Garmin takes about a min, X10MP about 30sec longer. Regular start, both take anywhere between 10-30 sec depending on weather conditions. With aGPS on, the X10MP gets a lock almost instantly on app startup.

Two apps I love on my X10 Mini Pro are MyTracks and MapDroyd. MyTracks needs data enabled only for initially loading/drawing the map... not for recording info.

Posted by mode

On 2011-06-22 19:48:25, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:41:17, mode wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:35:58, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-22 18:37 ]



My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH



Has nothing to do with how fast I'm going. I'm just saying the fact that I don't want to stop and in certain situation, I can't stop just to fix something. Therefore a high sensitivity sensor would be a better choice than an aGPS. Instead of taking 15 minute for it to fix on to a signal without data, it can just get a fix within a matter of second. In this case, inorder for me to alleviate this issue, I would have to stop my ride and fix it manually. That takes up my training time.


Understood. But I never had loss of connection with the sattelite signal before whilst on GPS. As I said, in my experience X10 has been flawless while driving, so I don't see how Active would be any different. If anything it should perform even better
[ This Message was edited by: mode on 2011-06-23 07:57 ]


Posted by goldenface
The GPS on the latest SE phones lock on in less than a minute. I just leave mine on all the time.

I would be surprised if this phone only had aGPS. The spec sheet could be wrong.
[ This Message was edited by: goldenface on 2011-06-23 08:43 ]


Posted by Arne Anka

On 2011-06-23 09:19:11, goldenface wrote:
I would be surprised if this phone only had aGPS. The spec sheet could be wrong.


As I mentioned earlier, even in air plane mode the GPS can lock instantly since required info about satellite positions is cached locally on the phone. Try it out and you'll see.

Posted by gayannr
Jeez! Get a life guys
aGPS is a better 'GPS' So don't worry.
My X10Mini locks on to satellites within less than 10s even in the Airplane mode


Posted by lolstebbo

On 2011-06-22 19:48:25, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:41:17, mode wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:35:58, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-22 18:37 ]



My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH



Has nothing to do with how fast I'm going. I'm just saying the fact that I don't want to stop and in certain situation, I can't stop just to fix something. Therefore a high sensitivity sensor would be a better choice than an aGPS. Instead of taking 15 minute for it to fix on to a signal without data, it can just get a fix within a matter of second. In this case, inorder for me to alleviate this issue, I would have to stop my ride and fix it manually. That takes up my training time.


And, as the rest of us have been saying, aGPS is just standard GPS (requires 3-4 satellite locks to confirm your location). It just uses cellular networks to help acquire the lock faster. If you lose your cellular phone signal, you don't lose your GPS bearings. If you lose your GPS bearings but still have cellular phone signal, then your phone can re-locate your exact bearings much more quickly than a standard GPS device. The use of cellular network triangulation has absolutely no effect on the aGPS system's ability to maintain a signal. If you have problems maintaining signal on an aGPS device, you'll have problems with a standard GPS device as well.

Posted by MNX1024

On 2011-06-24 02:40:30, lolstebbo wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:48:25, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:41:17, mode wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:35:58, MNX1024 wrote:

On 2011-06-22 19:07:36, lolstebbo wrote:

aGPS uses the mobile network to assist in getting an initial lock on your position. Once that initial position is acquired, the GPS positioning lock is active unless reception with GPS satellites is lost.


Yeah, as a cyclist that rides at 20+ MPH, I don't want to stop to fix a GPS issue, heck most of my group rides are like 23+ MPH. I would be dropped by the time I stop and fix it. Also, this is a marketed as a sports oriented device, why do I , the user, have to spend 5 minutes to get it to work. Whereas I can just turn it on and it would just work without me fiddling with it? With a high sensitivity receiver, I don't have to deal with this whole ordeal.

I do have to admit, this device is great for your everyday joe or recreational jogger who wants to have an all in one device.



My X10 GPS (locks in at 2 secs with aGPS) works flawlessly while driving from 55-80+MPH, I'm sure it can take your 20+MPH



Has nothing to do with how fast I'm going. I'm just saying the fact that I don't want to stop and in certain situation, I can't stop just to fix something. Therefore a high sensitivity sensor would be a better choice than an aGPS. Instead of taking 15 minute for it to fix on to a signal without data, it can just get a fix within a matter of second. In this case, inorder for me to alleviate this issue, I would have to stop my ride and fix it manually. That takes up my training time.


And, as the rest of us have been saying, aGPS is just standard GPS (requires 3-4 satellite locks to confirm your location). It just uses cellular networks to help acquire the lock faster. If you lose your cellular phone signal, you don't lose your GPS bearings. If you lose your GPS bearings but still have cellular phone signal, then your phone can re-locate your exact bearings much more quickly than a standard GPS device. The use of cellular network triangulation has absolutely no effect on the aGPS system's ability to maintain a signal. If you have problems maintaining signal on an aGPS device, you'll have problems with a standard GPS device as well.


Before I start, I do not intend to be rude or try to insult anyone, but what I may say may/will sound aggressive.

From what I can tell, most of you don't even know what I'm trying to get through to you guys. Mainly due to the fact that, I'm assuming, you guys are not serious cyclists or athletes that actually train with a computer, an electronic devices that can track your records, such as Heart Rate, Speed, Cadence, Wattage, and/or etc.

First, let me give you a device to compare with the Xperia Active:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=36728
This here is a cycling computer that uses a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. I also personally own one these.

What I'm trying to get to you guys is that, as a serious cyclist, the data I record for my rides are very important. While I'm on my 8 hour bicycle rides, which spans over 100+ miles, I would be bound to reach spots that have extremely weak GPS signal. With an aGPS I can guarantee you guys that I would lose signal somewhere along my rides. So, if I'm on airplane mode, and I'm constantly moving, there is almost no chance I can recover a signal. Even if I do recover signal, it would take god knows how long for it to. Therefore, I have lost that part of my training data. Now, if I were to use the Garmin Edge 500, these problem would not even happen. I will not lose signal, if the signal is extremely low, at most my speed would be slightly inaccurate.

Let's continue to airplane mode, without data to provide a more accurate of your position, an aGPS will not be as accurate compared to a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So for cars, it's fine, you don't need to record your speed. For cyclist and other athletes, yes, an accurate telling of our speed is necessary for training data. Heck, I may even argue, even with data, I highly doubt it's as accurate as a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So, if I'm using it as a training device, and my rides last 8 hours, I don't think I want to turn on data.

Some of you may say a good way to alleviate the issue of losing signal is turn on data and reconnect, then turn the phone back on airplane mode. Well, I even eat and drink while I ride on my bicycle, there's no way in hell I'd plan to stop during rides unless there's traffic, red light, and/or something important happens.

Now, to my main point. This device is suppose to aim at enthusiast athlete. Which mean people that takes training seriously. Therefore accurate training data is required, meaning that a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver is a better choice than a aGPS.

If they had use a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver, they could've trump this following device:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=69043 (Which is a top of the line cycling computer)
because that thing cost $450USD and only offers a low resolution resistive screen with maps that you may have to pay for later if you want to update. In terms of price, the active could even be cheaper(assumption here).

I hope I got my point through with what I just said. And please, don't mind this essay of mine .
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-24 03:27 ]


Posted by tranced
Please, just quote the necessary! We don't need to break a Guinness Record. Thanks.

Posted by mode

Before I start, I do not intend to be rude or try to insult anyone, but what I may say may/will sound aggressive.

From what I can tell, most of you don't even know what I'm trying to get through to you guys. Mainly due to the fact that, I'm assuming, you guys are not serious cyclists or athletes that actually train with a computer, an electronic devices that can track your records, such as Heart Rate, Speed, Cadence, Wattage, and/or etc.

First, let me give you a device to compare with the Xperia Active:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=36728
This here is a cycling computer that uses a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. I also personally own one these.

What I'm trying to get to you guys is that, as a serious cyclist, the data I record for my rides are very important. While I'm on my 8 hour bicycle rides, which spans over 100+ miles, I would be bound to reach spots that have extremely weak GPS signal. With an aGPS I can guarantee you guys that I would lose signal somewhere along my rides. So, if I'm on airplane mode, and I'm constantly moving, there is almost no chance I can recover a signal. Even if I do recover signal, it would take god knows how long for it to. Therefore, I have lost that part of my training data. Now, if I were to use the Garmin Edge 500, these problem would not even happen. I will not lose signal, if the signal is extremely low, at most my speed would be slightly inaccurate.

Let's continue to airplane mode, without data to provide a more accurate of your position, an aGPS will not be as accurate compared to a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So for cars, it's fine, you don't need to record your speed. For cyclist and other athletes, yes, an accurate telling of our speed is necessary for training data. Heck, I may even argue, even with data, I highly doubt it's as accurate as a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So, if I'm using it as a training device, and my rides last 8 hours, I don't think I want to turn on data.

Some of you may say a good way to alleviate the issue of losing signal is turn on data and reconnect, then turn the phone back on airplane mode. Well, I even eat and drink while I ride on my bicycle, there's no way in hell I'd plan to stop during rides unless there's traffic, red light, and/or something important happens.

Now, to my main point. This device is suppose to aim at enthusiast athlete. Which mean people that takes training seriously. Therefore accurate training data is required, meaning that a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver is a better choice than a aGPS.

If they had use a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver, they could've trump this following device:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=69043 (Which is a top of the line cycling computer)
because that thing cost $450USD and only offers a low resolution resistive screen with maps that you may have to pay for later if you want to update. In terms of price, the active could even be cheaper(assumption here).

I hope I got my point through with what I just said. And please, don't mind this essay of mine .
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-24 03:27 ]



That's like saying you expect SLR quality photos from a mobile phone As it is a cellphone, it only makes sense to have aGPS as it could utilize the cellphone signal to get the initial lock. If you are an actual professional, you should stick to specific standalone devices, just like a professional photographer should stick to SLRs instead of image centric mobile phones, no?
[ This Message was edited by: mode on 2011-06-24 03:59 ]


Posted by MNX1024

On 2011-06-24 04:55:57, mode wrote:
That's like saying you expect SLR quality photos from a mobile phone As it is a cellphone, it only makes sense to have aGPS as it could utilize the cellphone signal to get the initial lock. If you are an actual professional, you should stick to specific standalone devices, just like a professional photographer should stick to SLRs instead of image centric mobile phones, no?
[ This Message was edited by: mode on 2011-06-24 03:59 ]



Well, the funny thing is, this phone is just missing only the GPS receiver to be an SLR . It has a Barometer, compass, and ant+ on it, which are all the feature all high end cycling computer has. It's even water and scratch resistance, which most computers don't even have this feature. With the barometer, I can track my elevation, how much climbing and descending I did. Ant+, I can pair all kinds of sensors and meters to it. The compass, I guess it's a little extra, but will help with navigation if I get lost . Hence I'm complaining, it's missing that one little feature. Which does not bring the cost up much at all for it to be one complete device that can replace the high end computers out there.
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-24 04:23 ]


Posted by mode
I see your point, maybe you can take it up to SE Product Blog, they seem to listen to customer feedback, you might get your winner in the future But then again, from what I understand, the phone is equipped with GPS receiver, only made to be enhanced with network support hence the 'a' prefix in cases where sattelite signal is lost and can only be triangulated with the network signal. So in other words, it has GPS, and we don't even know how sensitive it is, so why don't you give it a go first and find out, for all you know your frustration might be unfounded
[ This Message was edited by: mode on 2011-06-24 04:31 ]


Posted by lolstebbo

On 2011-06-24 04:25:47, MNX1024 wrote:
Before I start, I do not intend to be rude or try to insult anyone, but what I may say may/will sound aggressive.

From what I can tell, most of you don't even know what I'm trying to get through to you guys. Mainly due to the fact that, I'm assuming, you guys are not serious cyclists or athletes that actually train with a computer, an electronic devices that can track your records, such as Heart Rate, Speed, Cadence, Wattage, and/or etc.

First, let me give you a device to compare with the Xperia Active:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=36728
This here is a cycling computer that uses a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. I also personally own one these.

What I'm trying to get to you guys is that, as a serious cyclist, the data I record for my rides are very important. While I'm on my 8 hour bicycle rides, which spans over 100+ miles, I would be bound to reach spots that have extremely weak GPS signal. With an aGPS I can guarantee you guys that I would lose signal somewhere along my rides. So, if I'm on airplane mode, and I'm constantly moving, there is almost no chance I can recover a signal. Even if I do recover signal, it would take god knows how long for it to. Therefore, I have lost that part of my training data. Now, if I were to use the Garmin Edge 500, these problem would not even happen. I will not lose signal, if the signal is extremely low, at most my speed would be slightly inaccurate.

Let's continue to airplane mode, without data to provide a more accurate of your position, an aGPS will not be as accurate compared to a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So for cars, it's fine, you don't need to record your speed. For cyclist and other athletes, yes, an accurate telling of our speed is necessary for training data. Heck, I may even argue, even with data, I highly doubt it's as accurate as a High Sensitivity GPS receiver. So, if I'm using it as a training device, and my rides last 8 hours, I don't think I want to turn on data.

Some of you may say a good way to alleviate the issue of losing signal is turn on data and reconnect, then turn the phone back on airplane mode. Well, I even eat and drink while I ride on my bicycle, there's no way in hell I'd plan to stop during rides unless there's traffic, red light, and/or something important happens.

Now, to my main point. This device is suppose to aim at enthusiast athlete. Which mean people that takes training seriously. Therefore accurate training data is required, meaning that a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver is a better choice than a aGPS.

If they had use a High Sensitivity GPS Receiver, they could've trump this following device:
https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=69043 (Which is a top of the line cycling computer)
because that thing cost $450USD and only offers a low resolution resistive screen with maps that you may have to pay for later if you want to update. In terms of price, the active could even be cheaper(assumption here).

I hope I got my point through with what I just said. And please, don't mind this essay of mine .
[ This Message was edited by: MNX1024 on 2011-06-24 03:27 ]



I'm going to be just as aggressive, then, but I also don't mean to be insulting.

Then, as mode has indicated, you clearly need a separate GPS unit. If you're seriously expecting a phone that is really just a ruggedized Xperia mini with some additional functionality to be able to also perform the function of a a GPS unit designed specifically for enthusiast athletes, you've got incredibly misguided expectations.

For instance, Cybershot phones target people that want a phone that can perform well for photography, but I'm not going to expect a Cybershot to be able to replace my SLR the next time I need to go on a shooting gig.

If Cybershot phones used 1/1.63" sensor, offered full PSAM controls, had actual glass lenses, and featured a fast aperture, then Sony Ericsson could trump enthusiast-level point-and-shoots. If Walkman phones had full EQ control, actually good sound chips, and full codec support, it could trump most PMPs. There's boatloads of such arguments that could be made for anything, but what it comes down to is: it's a damn cellphone. It has some additional functionality that can be of use to particular target demographics, but if you're expecting a cellphone to replace some sort of dedicated equipment, then keep dreaming.
[ This Message was edited by: lolstebbo on 2011-06-24 04:45 ]


Posted by MNX1024

On 2011-06-24 05:24:42, mode wrote:
I see your point, maybe you can take it up to SE Product Blog, they seem to listen to customer feedback, you might get your winner in the future But then again, from what I understand, the phone is equipped with GPS receiver, only made to be enhanced with network support hence the 'a' prefix in cases where sattelite signal is lost and can only be triangulated with the network signal. So in other words, it has GPS, and we don't even know how sensitive it is, so why don't you give it a go first and find out, for all you know your frustration might be unfounded
[ This Message was edited by: mode on 2011-06-24 04:31 ]



Ok ok, I admit, I was too lazy to put "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" instead of GPS on my first sentence . Guess it's time to take my point up to their Product Blog, wish me luck . And yes, I do know what an aGPS is, but I highly doubt it can even compete with a "High Sensitivity Receiver". It just dumb founds me that they include a barometer, but not a "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver".


On 2011-06-24 05:42:48, lolstebbo wrote:

I'm going to be just as aggressive, then, but I also don't mean to be insulting.

Then, as mode has indicated, you clearly need a separate GPS unit. If you're seriously expecting a phone that is really just a ruggedized Xperia mini with some additional functionality to be able to also perform the function of a a GPS unit designed specifically for enthusiast athletes, you've got incredibly misguided expectations.

For instance, Cybershot phones target people that want a phone that can perform well for photography, but I'm not going to expect a Cybershot to be able to replace my SLR the next time I need to go on a shooting gig.

If Cybershot phones used 1/1.63" sensor, offered full PSAM controls, had actual glass lenses, and featured a fast aperture, then Sony Ericsson could trump enthusiast-level point-and-shoots. If Walkman phones had full EQ control, actually good sound chips, and full codec support, it could trump most PMPs. There's boatloads of such arguments that could be made for anything, but what it comes down to is: it's a damn cellphone. It has some additional functionality that can be of use to particular target demographics, but if you're expecting a cellphone to replace some sort of dedicated equipment, then keep dreaming.
[ This Message was edited by: lolstebbo on 2011-06-24 04:45 ]



I do not believe I'm misguided. By using a "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" instead of an aGPS is feasible, unlike the modification you just mention. It will probably only warrant a $50(could be a little more since it's SE) increase and changes to the dimensions in millimeters. Unless SE decide to market this device for under $200USD, but I highly doubt it with specs like that. Also, this thing can already replaced a dedicated cycling computer because it has a barometer and ant+ module in it. All we got to do pair up a cadence/speed sensor, Heart Rate Monitor, and/or a power meter to it and I can display wattage, speed, heart rate, and cadence. The thing is, if they just tweak it a little by using a "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" instead of an aGPS. With that, the "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" can act as my odometer and I don't need a cadence/speed sensor. Meaning I don't have to attach all those sensor onto my bike.

Posted by lolstebbo

I do not believe I'm misguided. By using a "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" instead of an aGPS is feasible, unlike the modification you just mention. It will probably only warrant a $50(could be a little more since it's SE) increase and changes to the dimensions in millimeters. Unless SE decide to market this device for under $200USD, but I highly doubt it with specs like that. Also, this thing can already replaced a dedicated cycling computer because it has a barometer and ant+ module in it. All we got to do pair up a cadence/speed sensor, Heart Rate Monitor, and/or a power meter to it and I can display wattage, speed, heart rate, and cadence. The thing is, if they just tweak it a little by using a "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" instead of an aGPS. With that, the "High Sensitivity GPS Receiver" can act as my odometer and I don't need a cadence/speed sensor. Meaning I don't have to attach all those sensor onto my bike.


I had a medium-length response written, but my browser crashed. So TL;DR: the modifications I mention require probably about the same overall costs in resources and engineering that you mention. While the functionality would be good to have, it's clear that SE isn't aiming at the hardcore, just at the active (Case in point: they stuck with Maria Sharapova for the promo instead of featuring other athletes as well).

Also, the only thing High Sensitivity GPS has over standard and assisted GPS is simply additional sensitivity. If you bike through tunnels, underground passages, or buildings (and, I guess, ridiculously thick forests), then having High Sensitivity GPS would be crucial. Otherwise, aGPS will work just fine. There are apps that have odometer and tracking functionality.

Posted by smclion102
Xperia active - yes, it is waterproof!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G15lKDrrLc


EPIC

Posted by jplacson
YAY! if it's 30min at 1m, then that has the same rating as the old R310s I had... AND IT COMES IN ORANGE (my fav color) ... now... this or the ray...

Posted by odoylefm
The Sony Ericsson UK site is showing as "New" (although United States is still showing "Coming Soon").

http://www.sonyericsson.com/c[....]view/xperia-active?cc=gb&lc=en



Posted by Bonovox
How much is it sim free?? This could be a good device for clumsy people. Though I hate that horrible hook

Posted by sigtuna
Now in stock
http://www.phonehouse.se/Mobiltelefoner/Sony-Ericsson


Posted by rog
And here is the Unboxing video:

http://www.se-first.com/Xperia-active-Unboxing-Video.html


Posted by Bonovox
This device is now showing as in stock here on www.play.com


Posted by misserda
Here are some nice reviews and compares of the three top sport-called phones:

SE Xperia Active

Posted by yuunanase
I just received mine today, however not what I expect it to be. It is a Billabong version.



I quite like the colour though

Posted by mariozlp
^^nice

Posted by misserda
Nice!!!


Posted by Bonovox
That back cover is disgusting Here is a review
www.phonearena.com/Sony-Ericsson_Xperia-active-Review_id2857

Posted by zagi988
I have mine Active for a week now. It's a great phone. Here's one of my water videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xsi3mg-Rl_4

and this is the pack


BTW. any root for Active, Android 2.3.4.?
[ This Message was edited by: zagi988 on 2011-10-21 18:17 ]


Posted by Bonovox
I seen some You Tube videos of a guy diving into his pool with his Motorola Defy

Posted by ceaser2008
Very nice youtube videos of water diving, dipping, showers and gel splash.
Here in India, they are giving sony live view free with it. But price is 21k. So i think they have already included the price of live view as well.


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